Weekly Mysore Musings: Sun 2 Mar

My highlights from last week were:

  • Witnessing first hand the lovely Anu Ganesh working her culinary magic at a cooking lesson where we learnt how to make dosas, potato palya, coconut chutney and sambar, and then the best bit – we got to eat it all afterwards!
Dry frying the spices for sambar powder

Dry frying the spices for sambar powder

Anu making perfect dosas

Anu making perfect dosas

Anu taking us through her trusty masala box

Anu taking us through her trusty masala box

The finished article (minus a cheeky bite - couldn't resist!)

The finished article (minus a cheeky bite – couldn’t resist!)

  • Visiting a Hindu temple to perform prayers and seek blessings for Mahashivaratri, a huge festival to celebrate Shiva the Destroyer, with all-day fasting and all-night pujas. Many of the celebrations are centred on finding partners for unmarried women, so it felt like a particularly auspicious day for me! Om Namah Shivaya!
  • Climbing Mysore’s holy Chamundi Hill (mostly by rickshaw), walking 3 times around a huge statue of Nandi the bull (Shiva’s vehicle), enjoying stunning panoramic views of the sprawling city of Mysore, and visiting the Chamundeshwara temple at the top. The best part was managing, by complete fluke, to visit the day before Mahashivaratri which meant the place was almost deserted – by Indian standards at least!
Nandi the holy bull

Nandi the holy bull

Just a few of the 1,008 steps ascending Chamundi Hill

Just a few of the 1,008 steps ascending Chamundi Hill

The beautiful Chamundeshwara Temple atop Chamundi Hill

The beautiful Chamundeshwara temple

A cheeky Chamundi chimp!

A cheeky Chamundi chimp!

Enjoying sunset from Chamundi Hill

Enjoying sunset from Chamundi Hill

  • Enjoying a boogie to some cheesy dance music and indulging in a spot of rum punch and sangria at a new moon party very kindly hosted by the ever generous Whittle at The Blue House.
  • Moving house! After 2 months of living in a Maharana Suite at Mystic School, I decided it was time to move somewhere that felt a bit more homely. It was a tough decision, as I would be giving up so many luxuries: wifi, filtered water, hot power shower, new bathroom, fresh sheets & towels, lockable safe and a cafe with sauna and jacuzzi on the rooftop. “Are you mad?” I hear you cry! I know, I know but I’m now living in a sweet apartment in a different neighbourhood, which feels more Indian and less like a hotel room. I have to say the pink and green furnishings really sold it to me. And the best bit? I’m now much closer to the Chocolate Man!
  • In the process of arranging the move I had a day where I had lots to sort out, including trying to get the key off the previous tenant and contacting the flat owner via Facebook. By the afternoon I was experiencing this strange feeling that seemed so familiar and yet so alien too. Then I figured out what it was: stress. For the first time since I left the UK in the New Year I realised I haven’t once felt stressed. And now I was getting mildly agitated over such simple things as trying to organise a key handover and having a slow internet connection! Those long, pressurised days of slaving away in an office in the corporate world suddenly seemed such a long way away. And for that I’m so very, very grateful.
Old home....

Before….

... new home

….after

The local key cutters

The local roadside key cutter

The local removal guy aka my lovely flatmate Neal

The local removal guy aka my lovely flatmate Neal

  • Attending Lakshmish’s Sanskrit and Hatha Yoga Pradipika classes. As a Linguistics graduate I’m fascinated by language in all its forms, so am relishing the opportunity to learn the basics of this ancient language, which not only has a different alphabet to my mother tongue but many different sounds too. By the end of it I might even be able to decipher some of the mysterious chants we dutifully recite day after day.

The highlight of my yoga practice this week comes in the form of a small, cheeky 7-year-old Indian boy called Sambhav – Sharath’s son. He’s just the epitome of cuteness. On Thursday we had a counted led primary class due to the moon day on Friday, but it was also Mahashivaratri which is a public holiday, so Sambhav had the day off school. We were almost at the end of the practice, sitting in Yoga Mudra, with Sharath counting his slow count to ten. He had just called “Six” when suddenly this little voice piped up from the doorway, shouting “Seven!” The whole room was sent into fits of giggles and Sambhav proceeded to follow his father around the room and into both changing rooms during Utpluthih to make sure all his students were holding the dreaded posture for the full ten slow breaths! Simply adorable.

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14 thoughts on “Weekly Mysore Musings: Sun 2 Mar

  1. Its Hindu temple not Hindi temple and that too is a wrong name as the original name is ‘Sanatan Dharma’

  2. why did you remove my comment? Is it because it exposed you? You white people are so arrogant and racist! OMG You need to be exposed. Just wait till I come there……you guys will have to run then. Go back to your UK, dont come to India you racist scum.

  3. why did you remove my comment? Is it because it exposed you? You white people are so arrogant and racist! OMG You need to be exposed. Just wait till I come there……you guys will have to run then. Go back to your UK (which has more guilt per person), dont come to India you racist scum. When you dont have guts to acknowledge your own wrong doings how could you be a yogi.

    • Hi Naveen/kiterunnernick, I’m sorry you feel so angry on this topic. I appreciate your clarification and have made the change you suggested. My blog is intended merely as a travel and yoga journal where I’m sharing my experiences for those who wish to listen, and will continue to do so. If you don’t want to read my blog, kindly look elsewhere. Many thanks.

      • I will not look elsewhere if the topic is about India or anything related to that. If I find it racist, then we would shout, as simple as that. And also expose you guys, that how you guys want everything from India but dont respect Indians and India. Always moaning about this and that in India is a part of you westeners life. I am raising my voice against it. Nothing wrong in that. Just the way you dont see your views as racist, I dont see mine as wrong.

      • No it is not, because it is a fact. And you by creating a new blog and coming in support of her makes you think you are superior or would earn something out of it?

  4. Glad to know that you are learning Hindus’s Yoga in our own country, India. I hope you will share the immense knowledge and our cultural heritage with people across the world. I hope your objective is not like other foreigners who learn , gets certification and claim glory when they return back.

    • Hi Manoj, thank you for your comment. I have immense respect and humility towards India, your people and your cultural heritage and am enjoying learning as much as I can while I’m here. I believe many people outside India, particularly in the West could learn so much from Indian culture and, yes, I do intend to share what I learn with those who are interested to listen. With regard to yoga I have great respect for parampara and for following the teachings of my guru, which is why I am practising here in Mysore at the source. Thanks.

  5. One more thing I will request you is to learn Dharma, I believe if your teacher or instructor is not teaching you, Your work is half done. You can’t remove this word from your life. Ask him to teach about Dharma as well. When you go deep then you will see how deep are the roots of Hinduism. Don’t get confused with the word Dharma and Religion.

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